American Thanksgiving – A Social Experience

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Although I am not American, I am well aware that this weekend was Thanksgiving in the US.  I found this interesting picture while on Pinterest.  I found this picture interesting because it shows how easy it is to collect social media facts, it also shows how much of daily life people are posting on social media.

Social media is so integrated into everyone’s life that they feel the need to share their side dishes, desserts, recipes, and when they are eating dinner.  If as they were posting they realized that their social media engagement could be turned into statistics on Thanksgiving do you think this would cause people to think twice before posting.

As a social media user does it worry you that people are using your posts to monitor statistics?  Does know that marketing companies can target you through your posts cause you to rethink how open you are on social media or have you accepted this as a common factor of using social media?

The added benefit of this post is that on Black Friday people were still posting about turkey – meaning the true meaning of Thanksgiving is not lost — a big turkey dinner that is!!

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Snapchat – The Next Big Thing?

Is Snapchat Taking Over Social Media?

Snapchat is an application that many social media enthusiasts are familiar with.  Recently Snapchat announced that it has surpassed Facebook with regards to the number of pictures uploaded each day, 400 million vs. 350 million.  This does not come without surprise, thousands of people are constantly sending all of their friends photos via Snapchat.  I would not call myself an avid user of Snapchat, however I do have the application.  Without actively using the social media platform, I still receive a few pictures each day – and on days i’m feeling adventurous, I even send a couple out!

Unlike me, most people with the application are pretty darn obsessed with Snapchat.  Meaning they spend countless hours sending terrible “selfies”, pointless pictures and videos, and all sorts of other things.  This social media application has taken off like wildfire.  This dedication is something that can be tuned into and picked up.  If users are willing to spend so long on Snapchat their must be a way that organizations can turn this into a competitive advantage.

So if Snapchat is so popular, how long will it be before it is open for advertisement?  How can marketers involve Snapchat users as well as getting them excited? Snapchat has already been used in campaigns by a few different companies – some even receiving some levels of success.  But the difficulty comes in, with how much of an impression can a company deliver in 10 seconds – and is that even long enough to create a positive impression?  What marketers must decipher is if this is a trend or if this is a platform worth pursuing.  Do you think Snapchat is a successful marketing tool that is here to stay or do you believe it is a trend that will be gone as quickly as it arrived?

Don’t Get Your Cape Stuck in the Door

Passive Outrage, Passion, and Social Media

This article written by Michele Redmon brings to light a common theme that I see emerging every day on social media.  People are activists; passionate and ready to make a change in the world, simply by posting an article that they feels is of significant impact.  Although the intention of these posts is normally in the sincerest of ways, it should make one stop and think – am I really making a difference?  Is sharing an article really a means of standing up for what we believe in? Or is it really just a way for us to feel good about ourselves, without ever actually actively making a change?

People often don’t even look to see the legitimacy of articles they are sharing.  Articles come from bloggers who have done little research and cannot actually provide you with a credible source.  Before sharing articles and expressing our disbelief perhaps first social media enthusiasts should look to see if there is any legitimacy and truth to the stories being shared.  As is mentioned in the article above perhaps we should too take a look at ourselves before we are too quick to point figures, thereby making a social mockery of our hypocrisy.

The number of articles and amount of outrage one can witness from scouring social media each day, would lead an innocent viewer to believe that our world is filled with activists; people that are truly making a different in this world.  However, this is not true, beneath the outrage that all these people feel, is really just an amalgamation passive individuals, sharing the that a small click of a share button is really improving the world.  And while it may seem that I am not for the power that social media holds, that is not the case. I just think we need to be more critical of what we chose to share on social media and more critical how credible articles really are.  Instead of being passively outraged and becoming an ‘activist’ via social media, we must be analytical, and actively outraged, making ourselves true activists on something we thoroughly understand and feel the need to stand up for.

Overall, I think the lesson here is that we need to not always believe everything we read.  Social media is a powerful tool that can be used to reach out to many people within a matter of minutes.  We need to ensure that we are putting the best version of ourselves out there for people to see – showing the world how brilliant and independent we really are!